Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
or wind turbines. all of these things are encouraging because they're manufactured here in the u.s. or at least most of the parts are. and i would say that's an encouraging sign for the u.s. american worker. >> i'm glad you mentioned that high-speed train. i know that there is one in europe. and a lot of people wonder when in fact we will see a high-speed train like that in america. you are saying plans are under way for a high-speed train? >> absolutely. in fact, i know that in the northeast corridor and in different states there that are affected right now with the downsizing of the automobile industry, they have applied for high-speed rail. also in california here where i come from, they're looking at that long-term plan. and there have already been plans made for it years ago but there have been no funding. now we have been able to jump-start that. so i really do see a movement where we're connecting people and making it easier to commute to work, to live near where they work but also opening up business opportunities because as people make those stops at different places, they
. >> thanks, maria. >> thank you so much. robert reich joining us. >>> turning charitable promises into a reality. my conversation with president bill clinton about the economy, jobs, and innovation at the clinton global initiative. >>> and from clinton to bush. former first lady laura bush will join me to talk about life after the white house and her focus on women's education. as we take a break, take a look at how the stock market ended the week. >>> president clinton has been a busy man since he left the white house. he is turning promises inta reality, working with businesses and political leaders across the globe to improve lives after establishing the clinton global initiative to help realize change. this week i sat with him before a live audience at the cgi. we talked charity, taxes, and jobs. >> i think we have to target the areas where we know we can grow more jobs. we have to find ways to finance them and go where the money is. and we have to make sure we have people who can do those jobs. the areas that are most likely to produce big job growth are small business, becau
years. with summer behind us and midterm elections ahead of us, president obama hit the road this week to sell the administration's renewed focus on the economy. i spoke with treasury secretary timothy geithner about the plans the president announced this week to spur business innovation. >> i think they can make a very powerful impact. the first order of business is for congress to come and pass this set of very important tax breaks for small businesses. so they can start to hire people back again. once again, be the engine of job creation in this country. second thing, congress can extend the tax cuts that go to middle-class americans so they know today their taxes are not going to go up. those two things themselves are the most important things he can do right now. as you highlighted, you heard from the president today we want to work with congress to put in place a set of additional incentives to encourage investment not just in research and development in the united states but here today and start to rebuild america's infrastructure as well. those things are very important to long
makes up nearly 70% of the u.s. economy. and technology giant cisco will start returning some of the nearly $40 billion in cash it has to shareholders. the company says it will pay a dividend in 2011 of about 1% or 2%. >>> bill gross is the founder and cochief investment officer of financial giant pimco with more than $1.1 trillion of bonds and stock under its management. his total return fund is the world's largest mutual fund, valued at $247 billion. and his words carry weight on wall street and around the world. he joins me right now to talk more. bill so, good to have you on the program. thanks for joining us. >> thank you, maria. >> so it's been two years since the collapse of lehman brothers. you and your pimco team say we've entered a new normal. diminished expectations and growth. tell us what that new normal may look like. >> well, it looks like a slow growth environment with high unemployment in the united states. and it looks like a global economy in which developing economies such as china and brazil do much better than developed countries such as the united states
? there is sort of an us versus them type attitude when you have the promotion, the book promotion in ireland. you had some disruption of your time there. you canceled a similar event in london. were you surprised by that? what does this tell us about politics today? >> the people that mount these protests, that throw things and shout things and everything, in my experience, they're not representative of the broad majority, who even if they disagree with express that disagreement reasonably. the second thing, though, is something i call the tyranny of the protest. which means today in the world in which we live in politics, if you particularly with 24-hour a day, seven-day a week media, if you come out and do something extreme. suppose even a public meeting that a politician is holding, they've got a thousand people in the audience and five of them stand up and shout and throw things, i can guarantee the five will take the publicity. >> wars create upset, uncertainty and are very tough. >> that is absolutely natural that people feel very strongly. but even with those things, my experience, even wi
to be harder. it's going to take us a while to dig out of this. we've been growing for more than a year. we've seen more than 3/4 of a million private-sector jobs come back. that's a pretty good beginning. the big global companies in the united states that export to the rest of the world, americans are very innovative, productive, good at doing the things -- producing the things that the world needs. those are encouraging signs. but it is still very tough out there. >> my thanks to treasury secretary tim geithner. >>> up next on the "wall street journal report," a sputtering economy, a weak jobs market, what does it mean for your money? we'll talk to one of the smartest men on wall street. >>> and looking back at the september season that shook wall street to its very core. two years since that weekend that changed everything. is the street any wiser? with orbitz, i know what to expect from my vacation. bad dog, balloon pop. [ dog whimpers ] because orbitz has price assurance. leaf in face, marie, man with computer. [ man ] marie! if another orbitz customer books the same hotel or flight fo
understands enough about the economy to get us back on a growth path. >> where do you think we are in this recovery? what is the danger ahead for the fourth quarter of the year end 2011, which we continue to hear we're still into the great recession? >> i don't see much growth ahead, maria. 1.6 annualized growth second quarter. i think the third quarter is going to be very similar. i don't see us growing fast enough, at least in the foreseeable future to bring unemployment down very much, if at all. it's not only going to have negative repercussions perhaps extending to 2012, but also the burden and pain in the population is enormous. you know, there is no secret to me why you have all this anger, this bitterness, this frustration, this anxiety expressing itself in a politics of resentment. that's what has happened every time in our history when you get so many people so concerned about their jobs. >> if the bush tax cuts expire for those making more than $250,000 a year, what kind of an impact would you expect on consumer spending, incentives to the business community to creat
and streamlined production. they used to make 13,000 different pieces. now they make just 6,000. >> the lady over there is actually filling in the last -- >> reporter: the store sold lego land to a company that actually knows how to run a theme park. popular lines, many of them aimed at girls, were discontinued. >> when we were struggling i was thinking, geez, i don't know where the lego is part of a future. >> reporter: he figured even in an age of tv and video games kids want to play with their hands. lego has moved away from the purer, simpler lego i remember from my youth. ♪ >> reporter: these days lego men carry guns. there's more fighting and it seems, more instructions. >> you can build the high-tech lego agent's car. >> reporter: while i felt that lego let my imagination run wild -- >> it's in your hands to help indiana jones solve the great mystery. >> reporter: now kids are told how to create an indiana jones fight scene. by doing that you are imposing some limits or directions on the child easily creative play. >> i don't think it limits their imagination, i think it shows them, here
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)